I agree to Idea Faster Internet for a Faster and more efficient Province.
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I disagree to Idea Faster Internet for a Faster and more efficient Province.

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Faster Internet for a Faster and more efficient Province.

Whereas Federal rules governing Internet Service Providers dissuade foreign investment and open competition, which results in duopolies, monopolies, and needlessly inflated service prices in tandem with atrociously reduced speeds, service, and arbitrary "bandwidth caps".

Whereas said reduced speeds, service, and arbitrary "bandwidth caps" reduces the true potential of business, research and development, and ease of access to consumers in a world where broadband technology is far more advanced than what we have in Ontario.

Whereas the market duopoly or monopoly (depends where you live) that plague regions across Ontario are not conducive to market competition nor technological innovation, while allowing "third party" providers that rent broadband infrastructure from said duopolies or monopoly hasn't shown itself to be an effective countermeasure for the purpose of long term broadband infrastructure development.

Whereas the average internet speed in Canada is 7.6mbps (megabits per second), whilst the average speeds in Japan and South Korea are at an enviable 61mbps and is 46mbps, respectively; and the average cost per megabit per second in Canada is $6.50, which is reflected in prices in Ontario, while the average cost per megabit per second is $0.27 in Japan, $0.45 in South Korea, $0.63 in Sweden, $1.64 in France, and $3.33 in a country with comparable land mass: the USA.

Whereas rural Ontario continues to suffer from the digital divide, whilst Google is establishing 1 gigabit per second speeds in Rural Kansas, which is approximately 130x faster than our average speed.

Whereas the Federal Government can not be relied on establishing an effective digital strategy, given that they haven't shown initiative for 6 years, and that waiting for the Federal Government to act on this issue is time taken away from improving our own broadband infrastructure.

Whereas provincial investment in LTE and fibre-optic broadband infrastructure, with the goal of striving towards the highest average internet speeds with the most competitive price/mbps in the world, in tandem with our highly educated workforce, research & development, incubators, and ideal business environment, can and will make us the most technologically innovative state in the world.

Therefore be it resolved that the Government of Ontario establish a digital economy strategy, with the goal of having preferably the highest average internet speeds with the most competitive prices in the world, connected to every household, business, and institution in Canada, preferably by the year 2020.

Submitted by Sushil Tailor 11 months ago

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Comments (16)

  1. PPP would be ideal. The strategy should address private (individual/commercial and business) access, and public sector (including schools, universities and colleges, hospitals) access.

    There would be much to say about the widening digital divide. Just to mention education, we have a moral imperative to provide the same opportunities to all Ontario kids, regardless of where they live.

    11 months ago
    3 Agreed
    1 Disagreed
  2. This is not even vaguely a policy priority when so many are unemployed and living in poverty.

    11 months ago
    1 Agreed
    6 Disagreed
    1. This will be hugely beneficial to help lift people out of poverty and unemployment. Skills training is available online and people can take online courses now from all over the world for free. Education is the silver bullet and those who don't have internet access are missing out on an opportunity to make themselves employable. When you're in poverty or unemployed, being disconnected from the ever-changing online world is a further impairment.

      11 months ago
      5 Agreed
      1 Disagreed
    2. In fact this is a priority to lift the Ontario economy up. The only way to succeed in the knowledge economy is to empower all citizens to thrive in it.

      10 months ago
      2 Agreed
      1 Disagreed
  3. Poverty and unemployment have been around for a very long time, it serves as neither a reason nor an excuse for inaction on this matter. Affordable internet rates affect everything from healthcare, employment, education and an inclusive society.

    11 months ago
    2 Agreed
    0 Disagreed
  4. Very nicely put, Shane Mackenzie, and we can tell the kind of government we have by the effort that they put into something as wide reaching as affordable and fast internet for its citizens for exactly the reasons that you've outlines.

    11 months ago
    2 Agreed
    1 Disagreed
  5. Thanks for this. I was going to submit a similar idea. As a librarian I know first-hand the value of being connected to information and how important it is in the modern economy. I would like to add that another ingredient in the success of this is making sure that all Ontarians have access to the skills and equipment they need to access the online world.

    10 months ago
    1 Agreed
    1 Disagreed
  6. Federally, we need fewer billions spent on a spy-palace and more on developing our wealth of Canadian know-how. Provincially we need to ensure that we empower our citizens with the tools to do that. Fast, inexpensive internet is simply the best bang for the buck.

    10 months ago
    2 Agreed
    1 Disagreed
  7. Ian

    Excellent policy, showing forethought on your part. Should make a difference in so many ways. If businesses don't act in a fair manner and their unsound decisions greatly affect our Nation's development, we trust that our Government will step in on our behalf. Faster Internet is a reality, yet it is being denied to us. Everyone needs to be connected.

    10 months ago
    2 Agreed
    1 Disagreed
    1. And to be connected for free!

      9 months ago
      0 Agreed
      0 Disagreed
  8. Unfortunately, I believe "lobbying" which includes substantial "pay-offs" in the form of "donations" keeps the government complacent.

    10 months ago
    0 Agreed
    1 Disagreed
  9. The government should provide the infrastructure (in the same way that it provides roads, rail and sewers) and charge the utility companies (that is, the ISPs) for access to it in order to finance the maintenance.

    A telecom infrastructure where each ISP has to lay its own wiring or rent someone else's is analogous to having a rail system where each train company needs to lay its own track for its own trains. Why have 2 substandard wires going to each house (phone, cable) when you can have one decent wire instead?

    10 months ago
    2 Agreed
    1 Disagreed
  10. Are we keeping in mind when creating an infrastructure that the communication technologies are changing so fast, that a new infrastructure becomes obsolete before it is even in place? Wireless technologies have already made a huge jump, and it is just a matter of time that wireless with satellites will be the standard. And then, what else?

    10 months ago
    1 Agreed
    0 Disagreed
    1. Right, but the infrastructure is a sunk cost. Regardless of who builds it (government or private business), it'll still need to be maintained and upgraded. Regardless of who upgrades or builds it, consumers will bear a cost of that construction.

      Arguably, the cost of a nationalised telecoms infrastructure will be cheaper in public hands because:

      a) it will only need to be built and maintained once (as opposed to once for each telecoms company); and

      b) government doesn't need to make a return on capital whereas corporations do - therefore, a premium on the cost of the infrastructure will work its way onto the consumer bills simply to finance the outgoing dividends.

      Also, these things don't become obsolete quite as quickly as you think. DSL is built upon the copper telephone wiring which has been the backbone of our telephone system for decades. A fibre optic network, I believe, would provide peak speeds (as it works on light, not electrons) and not be rendered obsolete until we invent something like quantum tunnelling.

      9 months ago
      1 Agreed
      0 Disagreed
  11. Yes, for mobile devices. But for the foreseeable future, you`ll never get a 1Gbps satellite image capable of facilitating tele-robotic surgery, for instance. We`re not talking about people being able to communicate on their smartphones. We`re talking about being able to develop high-tech applications, run home-based businesses, and the like. There's a reason why many of our competitors in Asia are investing in this type of infrastructure.

    10 months ago
    1 Agreed
    1 Disagreed
  12. There's always a reason not to do something, and sometimes those reasons are valid, this isn't one of them.

    Yes, technology is changing fast, but, like Todd Kyle explained smartphones aren't the only way that people use the internet.

    It was predicted that with tablets, books would immediately become obsolete, that hasn't happened and part of the reason for that is the speed that technology changes. I need no new device to read a book, it comes with its own.

    It's good to see divergent thinking, but it should be constructive and not a hindrance.

    10 months ago
    0 Agreed
    1 Disagreed